Paleontologists for the day

Posted by on Nov 6, 2015 in Howard and Betty, Kathleen's Blog | 0 comments

Paleontologists for the day

Thanks for being such interested and hard

Betty was there to help us learn about the ice age and fossils.

Betty was there to help us learn about the ice age and fossils.

working students when Betty, Blanche and Beulah came for the latest Howard and Betty adventure.  Here are some of the photos of the day and reminders of what we learned.  See you in December.

Paleontologists have to take detailed notes about what they find.   That's what you did when you wrote in your Howard and Betty journal about the fossils you saw.

Paleontologists have to take detailed notes about what they find. That’s what you did when you wrote in your Howard and Betty journal about the fossils you saw.

We used a description sheet to sort fossils.   The sheet gave us the name of the animal and how old it was and what period it lived.

We used a description sheet to sort fossils. The sheet gave us the name of the animal and how old it was and what period it lived.

 

The fossil exhibit had fossils from Marquette County as well as from other states and from around the world.  There were some made through the permineralization  process and some that were casts or molds.

The fossil exhibit had fossils from Marquette County as well as from other states and from around the world. There were some made through the permineralization process and some that were casts or molds.

 

There are also trace fossils, fossils formed not from the animal or plant but from something they left behind like poop!   Here is a piece of coprolite which is fossilzed poop.  This is from a prehistoric turtle that lived in what is now Florida.

There are also trace fossils, fossils formed not from the animal or plant but from something they left behind like poop! Here is a piece of coprolite which is fossilzed poop. This is from a prehistoric turtle that lived in what is now Florida.

 

Mrs. Christensen helped us choose a crinoid fossil, bag it, and staple it to a label card.  We dated our find.

Mrs. Christensen helped us choose a crinoid fossil, bag it, and staple it to a label card. We dated our find.

 

This is the animal your crinoid fossil was formed from.  Your fossil came from somewhere along the stalk of a crinoid.

This is the animal your crinoid fossil was formed from. Your fossil came from somewhere along the stalk of a crinoid.

 

We also sketched a fossil so we paid close attention to the details of the fossil.

We also sketched a fossil so we paid close attention to the details of the fossil.

 

We had a wooly mammoth and a baby wooly mammoth visit!

We had a wooly mammoth and a baby wooly mammoth visit!

 

12,000 years ago a glacier covered part of Wisconsin and most of what we now know as Marquette County.

12,000 years ago a glacier covered part of Wisconsin and most of what we now know as Marquette County.

Remember where you can see glacial features in Marquette County?   Ennis Lake in John Muir Park is a kettle lake.   The Moundville Church sits on a drumlin.  Lawrence Lake is in a tunnel channel.

Remember where you can see glacial features in Marquette County? Ennis Lake in John Muir Park is a kettle lake. The Moundville Church sits on a drumlin. Lawrence Lake is in a tunnel channel.

 

Thanks for learning about the ice age and fossils in Marquette County!

Thanks for learning about the ice age and fossils in Marquette County!

 

 

 

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